Friday, 23 February 2018

THE GUERNSEY LITERARY POTATO PIE Society AND DEVOn

This film is set in World War Two during the occupation of GUERNSEY.It centres around the above name of the eccentric book club formed during this period . In 2017 parts of Bideford Devon were transformed to look like Guernsey complete with Swatikas on the walls ,pictures of Hitler above shop windows. Other locations used in the film were Hartland and Covelly including the use of locals as extras .A second war fighter plane landed on Sauton  Sands.

Red Handfish

Off the coast of island of Tasmania dwells a colony of  Red Handfish of 20 to 40 in number the only other one know is exists a couple of Miles away.The Red Handfish can walk along seabed using its flippers shaped like hands.It is among the world's rarest fish.

Big Nose get a the ladies if your Proboscis Monkey

Male Probocis Monkeys who have the largest noses also have the largest harem of the female of the species .The Large noses or snouts serve as form of advertising to females to help them select the best male also a bigger body and testes help.Theses  suggest a deli and social dominate male.

Barker people Ty to the Sun newspaper for article

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BEAK TO REALITY 

How the first Britons were wiped out by boozy Beaker people who invaded the UK and their blood STILL runs through us today

Groundbreaking DNA tests showed the mysterious Beaker people - so named because of their favourite drinking vessel - quickly spread across Britain
ANCIENT Brits were wiped out by immigrants from mainland Europe — who introduced booze to our shores for the first time.
The newcomers, known as the Beaker people due to their favourite drinking vessels, replaced at least 90 per cent of the original population within a few hundred years, groundbreaking DNA tests have shown.
 The reconstructed face of Ava, a woman from the Beaker clan
UNIVERSAL NEWS & SPORT (EUROPE)
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The reconstructed face of Ava, a woman from the Beaker clan
The light-skinned and blue-eyed Beakers first arrived in Britain around 4,500 years ago and quickly spread their culture — and their taste for honey mead — across our island.
They had already spent the previous few centuries moving across Western Europe and now their true impact on British culture has been uncovered for the first time.
Analysis of hundreds of skeletons found Brits who lived shortly after their fabled pots appeared here have very different DNA to those before.
The old inhabitants of Britain - who built monuments like Stonehenge and took part in basic farming - were outmatched by the Beaker's love of metal work.
 The Beaker people spread across western Europe from Spain and reached Britain 4,500 years ago
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The Beaker people spread across western Europe from Spain and reached Britain 4,500 years ago
 The Beaker people are known for their distinctive bell-shaped cups
JUNTA DE CATILLA Y LEON, ARCHIVO MUSEO NUMANTINO
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The Beaker people are known for their distinctive bell-shaped cups
Their arrival heralded the beginning of the Bronze Age and the decline of ancient Neolithic Brits possibly through new disease rather than violence.
Prof Ian Armit, of the University of Bradford who took part in the research by 144 European and US scientists, said: “The available evidence doesn’t necessarily suggest a violent invasion.
“There might have been environmental problems which caused a population decline or the Beaker migrants could have brought new diseases with them.”
Co-author Professor Mark Thomas, an evolutionary geneticist at University College London, said: "The sheer scale of population replacement in Britain is going to surprise many, even though the more we learn from ancient DNA studies, the more we see large-scale migration as the norm in prehistory."
 The Beakers replaced about 90 per cent of Britain's native population in just 500 years
JUNTA DE CATILLA Y LEON, ARCHIVO MUSEO NUMANTINO
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The Beakers replaced about 90 per cent of Britain's native population in just 500 years
 The remains of beaker people next to one of their cups
DAVE WEBB / CAMBRIDGE ARCHAEOLOGICAL UNIT
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The remains of beaker people next to one of their cups
Such is the impact of the Beakers - who originally came from the steppes of Ukraine and Russia - that many modern Brits can claim a direct heritage.
Prof Armit said: "Anyone who's got British ancestry going back a couple of hundred years will have a predominance of steppe ancestry.
"Once it's here, that's essentially the ancestry of the British population".
Dr Tom Booth, an archaeologist from the Natural History Museum, said: "This spectacular transformation of Britain, with such a large number of Beaker people coming here is the opposite of what experts have thought for the last 10 to 20 years.
"The textbooks need to be ripped up."
Cheddar Man, ​who lived in Britain over 10,000 years ago, was recreated thanks to DNA analysis


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THE GUERNSEY LITERARY POTATO PIE Society AND DEVOn

This film is set in World War Two during the occupation of GUERNSEY.It centres around the above name of the eccentric book club formed durin...